Keynote Speakers

Alistair_Rendell_picture.JPG

Alistair Rendell
Dr. Rendell, Department of Computer Science ANU College of Engineering and Computer Science Australian National University Canberra, ACT 0200 Australia

Title: Computational Science Applications for Modern Parallel Architectures: Experiences, Challenges and Future Opportunities

wanlei.gif

Wanlei Zhou
Prof. Wanlei Zhou, Chair of Information Technology, Associate Dean (International) Faculty of Science and Technology, Deakin University

Melbourne, Australia

Title: Effective Parallel Spam Filtering using Multiple Classifiers

wanlei.gif

Stephan Olariu
Prof. Stephan Olariu, Department of Computer Science, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, USA

 

Title: An architecture for Traffic Incident Detection


Alistair Rendell
Dr Rendell has a BSc from Durham University and a PhD from the University of Sydney. He is widely known for his work in the development, application and tuning of computational science applications (particularly chemistry) to high performance scientific environments. In late eighties he developed a highly vectorized and parallelized coupled-cluster algorithms that achieved over 90% of the peak performance on an 8 processor Cray Y-MP. During the early 90.s he developed the first massively parallel coupled cluster code, a code that now forms part of NWChem computational chemistry program. This work pioneered the use of one-sided communications for implementing pseudo shared memory on distributed memory computers, concepts from this work are now included in the widely used Global Arrays and Distributed Data Interface libraries.

 

From 1995-2000 he worked at the Australian National University (ANU) Supercomputer Facility where he led a major collaborative project concerned with the development, porting, and optimization of computational science software for Fujitsu supercomputers. While this work was commercial in confidence, the results from this work were incorporated into a variety of well know computational packages (e.g. Gaussian, Amber, GAMESS etc). 

 

In 2001 Dr. Rendell joined the faculty in the Computer Science Department. Since then he has been promoting research and teaching in all aspects of high performance computing. Within the Department he currently leads the Computer Systems group comprising 15-20 members. He has active collaborations with a variety of industry partners and is author of over 75 refereed publications.


For more information, refer to his home page.

Title: Computational Science Applications for Modern Parallel Architectures: Experiences, Challenges and Future Opportunities
Abstract: For many years we have been developing computational science applications, particularly chemistry, for high performance parallel systems.  This talk will highlight some of our recent work related to non-uniform memory access (NUMA) parallel systems, the development and use of cluster-enabled openMP environments, and the exploitation of novel parallel architectures such as the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) available on NVIDIA GPUs and the IBM Cell Broadband Engine (Cell BE).  On NUMA systems our goal is to build models that can be used to predict performance as a function of memory and thread placement and that can be exploited during runtime to enhance performance.  For cluster OpenMP we have both developed our own in-house software distributed memory system, but are also working with Intel on their Cluster OpenMP (ClOMP) product. Results using ClOMP for the Gaussian quantum chemistry code will be presented and discussed. For the GPU and the Cell BE system we have been exploring the development of molecular dynamics and machine learning applications on these two systems. In this talk we will attempt to compare the two platforms, their relative merits and difficulties. 

TOP

Wanlei Zhou
Professor Wanlei Zhou received his PhD degree from The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia, in October 1991. He also received the DSc degree from Deakin University, Victoria, Australia in 2002. He is currently the Chair Professor of Information Technology and the Associate Dean (International), Faculty of Science and Technology, Deakin University, Melbourne, Australia. His research interests include distributed and parallel systems, network security, mobile computing, bioinformatics and e-learning. Professor Zhou has published more than 170 papers in refereed international journals and refereed international conferences proceedings. Since 1997 Professor Zhou has been involved

in more than 50 international conferences as General Chair, Steering Chair, PC Chair, Session Chair, Publication Chair, and PC member. Professor Zhou is a member of the IEEE.


For more information, refer to his home page.

 

Title: Effective Parallel Spam Filtering using Multiple Classifiers
Abstract: Emails have now become an integral part of everyday life and a prime means of communication tool for idea and information exchange. However, along with the rapid growth of the Internet and email, there has been a dramatic growth in spam in recent years. Spam is commonly defined as unsolicited email messages and protecting email from infiltration of spam is an important research and practical issue nowadays. Spam filtering using classification algorithms has been successfully used in practice, but with certain amount of false positive tradeoffs. False positive is unacceptable in many cases as the loss of an important email could have significant implications. This problem is mainly caused by the dynamic nature of spam contents, sending strategies as well as diversification of the classification algorithms.  This talk will introduce the innovative solutions carried out in my research group for effective parallel spam filtering using multiple classifiers which will be able to achieve high accuracy and overcome the false positive problem.  The talk is divided into the following parts:

1.    Current spam filtering methods

2.    The multi-classifier classification model

3.    Grey list analysis and dynamic feature selection 

4.    A multi-core framework for multi-classifier email classification

TOP

 

Stephan Olariu
Professor Olariu has held many different roles and responsibilities as a member of numerous organizations and teams. Much of his experience has been with the design and implementation of robust protocols for wireless networks and in particular sensor networks and their applications. He is applying mathematical modeling and analytical frameworks to the resolution of problems ranging from securing communications, to predicting the behavior of complex systems, to evaluating performance of wireless networks. His research interests are in the area of complex systems enabled by large-scale deployments of sensors and more specifically in securing systems of systems. Professor Olariu is a world-renowned technologist in the areas of wireless networks, mobile multimedia systems, parallel and distributed systems, parallel and distributed architectures and networks. He was invited and visited more than 120 universities and research institutes around the world lecturing on topics ranging from wireless networks and mobile computing, to biology-inspired algorithms and applications, to telemedicine, to wireless location systems, and security. He is the Director of the Sensor Networks Research Group at Old Dominion University.


For more information, refer to his home page.

 

Title: An architecture for Traffic Incident Detection
Abstract: Road and traffic safety can be improved if the drivers have the ability to see further down the road and can be informed of relevant traffic events, including collisions and slow-downs.  The recently proposed VANETs (Vehicular Ad hoc Networks) are expected to enable both vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) and vehicle-to-roadside (V2R) communications. Virtually all the papers published in the literature assume that V2V communications will rely on a strong roadside infrastructure. Unfortunately, the roadside infrastructure, is very likely to be the target of theft, vandalism and other similar activities that will jeopardize their intended functionality. Worse yet, one can easily contemplate a scenario where the roadside infrastructure may be hacked and injected with malicious code, rendering it not only useless but, downright dangerous.

However, all the VANET systems proposed thus far are afflicted with serious security and privacy problems. Indeed, the way current systems are set up, the driver of a car that participates in the traffic will not be able to preserve their privacy and may be subject to impersonation or Sybil attacks. The problem stems from the fact that V2V communication can be traced back to an individual car. Even if several pseudonyms are used, detecting the true identity of the driver and, therefore, invading their privacy appears to be unavoidable.

In a sharp departure from the common wisdom we propose to look at vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) and vehicle-to-roadside (V2R) communications from a different perspective. Instead of relying on the roadside infrastructure that is vulnerable to attacks, we propose to embed in the asphalt covering the surface of the roads sensor belts. Each belt consists of a collection of pressure sensors, optionally equipped with piezo-electric elements. The belts can detect and interact with passing cars.

In this talk we discuss in detail NOTICE our architecture for traffic incident detection and show that it can be easily extended to cover many problems of interest in infotainment and peer-to-peer content delivery. One important application of NOTICE is with planned evaluations when optimal use must be made of available transportation resources.

TOP