Keynote Speakers

Tosiyasu L. Kunii
Dr.Sc., Life Fellow of IEEE, Professor and Director, IT Institute, Kanazawa Institute of Technology, Japan

Title: Autonomic and Trusted Computing for Ubiquitous Intelligence

Hartmut Schmeck
Prof. Dr., Institute AIFB,
Karlsruhe Institute of Technology,
Germany

Title: Remarks on Self-organisation and Trust in Organic Computing Systems

 

PowerPoint Slides

Keith C.C. Chan
Prof. The Hong Kong Polytechnic University

Hong Kong

Title: An Intelligent Home System as a Development and Test Platform for Ubiquitous Computing

 

PowerPoint Slides


Tosiyasu L. Kunii
Tosiyasu L. Kunii is currently Professor and IT Institute Director at Kanazawa Institute of Technology, Distinguished Professor and Advisor of Beihang University in Beijing, Honorary Visiting Professor of University of Bradford in UK, and Professor Emeritus of the University of Tokyo and of the University of Aizu. He was Professor of Hosei University from 1998 to 2003. Before that he served as the Founding President and Professor of the University of Aizu dedicated to computer science and engineering as a discipline, from 1993 to 1997. He had been Professor of Department of Computer and Information Science at the University of Tokyo from June 1978 until March 1993, after serving as Associate Professor at Computer Centre of the University of Tokyo in October 1969. He was visiting professors at University of California at Berkeley in 1994 and University of Geneva in 1992. He received his B.Sc. in 1962, M.Sc. in 1964 and D.Sc. in 1967 all from the University of Tokyo. He received the 1998 Taylor L. Booth Education Award the highest education award of IEEE Computer Society given to one individual a year. He is Life Fellow of IEEE and Fellow of IPSJ. He has published over 50 books and over 400 refereed papers in computer science. Dr. Kunii was Founder and Editor-in-Chief of The Visual Computer: An International Journal of Computer Graphics (Springer-Verlag) (1984-1999), and International Journal of Shape Modeling (World Scientific) (1994-1995), and was Associate Editor of IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications (1982-2002). He is Associate Editor-in-Chief of The Journal of Computer Animation and Virtual Worlds (John Wiley & Sons) (1990- ) and on the Editorial Board of Information Systems Journal (1976-), and Information Sciences Journal (1983-).

For more information, refer to his home page.

Title: Autonomic and Trusted Computing for Ubiquitous Intelligence
Abstract: The real world we live has been expanding globally, integrating almost all local activities in business, finance, commerce, politics, industry, education and culture, via cyberworlds that attach e- to all. The strength of cyberworlds lies on its speed and unlimited power of reutilization supported by cyberspaces as networked computational spaces spanning the entire real world ubiquitously. It was 1968 cyberworlds in cyberspaces faced me with thrills of finding infinitely spanning worlds at light speed.
To define cyberworlds in cyberspaces clearly we have to find the laws governing them. It is the same situation with the world of matter. The world of matter was understood clearly only by finding its invariants such as mass and energy. From the invariants, physics has derived theories to govern the whole material world as variants. Cyberworlds are information worlds. Hence, finding the invariants of information worlds is the key to the success. The laws of information worlds as the discipline belong to what we call mathematics. Mathematical invariants are, in most general cases, equivalence relations. This means, autonomous and trusted computing is automatically achieved through equivalence relations and attaching functions. Autonomous computing means we build information systems automatically without human intervention that is achieved by automatically constructing information systems by relating components via attaching functions in a valid manner. The results are trusted because they carry out only validated construction through invariant preservation.
For us to conduct any activities in the real world in physical spaces and cyberworlds in cyberspaces, we have to cognize them in conceptual worlds in conceptual and cognitive spaces. The intelligent parts of cognition for conceptualization rely on induction of concepts from cumulative knowledge gathered ubiquitously on the Web from cyberworlds and also physical devices ubiquitously in the real world, and then rely on deduction to apply the results of conceptualization to individual instances. Induction and deduction based on traditional logic are found to be too limited in their capability, and they are becoming topological, algebraic topological in particular to compute.
For intelligence to be autonomic and trusted, the invariants as explained so far play the central role. Autonomy is achieved by integrating all the cyberworlds by attaching functions based on invariants autonomously, and by deducing rapidly evolving variants from invariants also autonomously, to make the results trusted. Autonomous visual computing based on differential topology for autonomous digital contents generation is of increasing interest in the ubiquitous information communication community, and we have achieved the core portion for presentation in this talk.

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Hartmut Schmeck
Hartmut Schmeck is a Full Professor of Applied Informatics and director of the Institute AIFB at the University of Karlsruhe (now called Karlsruhe Institute of Technology). He has held visiting positions at Queen's University (Kingston, Canada, 1983/84), Technical University of Denmark (Lyngby, Denmark, 1990), University of Hildesheim (1989) and University of Munster (1990/91). He got his Habilitation (1990), Dr.rer.nat (1981), and Diploma (1975) in Informatics, all from the University of Kiel (Germany). From 2000 to 2002 he has been Dean of the Faculty of Economics and Business Engineering of the University of Karlsruhe; from 2002 to 2006 he was the chairperson of the Section of Computer Engineering of the Gesellschaft fur Informatik. He is (co-)author of more than 110 publications on advanced algorithms and architectures, in particular on bio-inspired methods in optimization and algorithms for reconfigurable architectures. He has been program and conference chair for several international conferences and workshops, is a key member of the "Organic Computing Initiative" and coordinator of the DFG priority program SPP 1183 on &quotOrganic Computing". His research interests within this initiative focus on methods and architectures for controlled self-organization and on organic traffic control.

For more information, refer to his home page.

Title: Remarks on Self-organisation and Trust in Organic Computing Systems
Abstract: The vision of Organic Computing postulates the advent of multitudes of services provided by collections of intelligent devices by means of self-organized cooperation. Due to their large numbers and their versatile interactions in potentially unlimited networks, it will be unfeasible to explicitly control the behavior of these (partially mobile) devices and their services. Therefore, they will have to respond autonomously in an intelligent way to changing parameters in their environment in order to guarantee appropriate degrees of behavioral robustness and flexibility. Because of these life-like properties, they are called Organic Computing systems. Apparently, the behavior of adaptive, self-organized systems might be hard to predict. At the same time, these systems will have to be trustworthy to be accepted by human users, otherwise, their potential benefits would not be exploited. A necessary prerequisite for establishing and maintaining trust will be the possibility to influence the behavior of Organic Computing systems in a controlled way whenever the system is moving into behavioral regions that are viewed to be unacceptable by human users or by their current execution environment. Hence, an important facet of Organic Computing is the presence of controlled self-organization, enabled by appropriately designed observer/controller mechanisms and methods of data analysis. The talk will elaborate on the state of the art in the area of Organic Computing and, in particular, will focus on possibilities and problems for the engineering of trustworthy organic systems.

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Keith C.C. Chan
Prof. Keith Chan obtained his B.Math. (Hons.) in Computer Science and Statistics,  and M.A.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in Systems Design Engineering from the University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. He has a number of years of academic and industrial experience in software development and management.  He joined the IBM Canada Laboratory, Toronto Canada, in 1989, where he was involved in the development of multimedia and software engineering tools. In 1993, he joined the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada as an Associate Professor. He returned to HK in 1994 to join the Hong Kong Polytechnic University where he is currently a Professor and Head of the Department of Computing.  He co-founded a Joint Software Engineering Laboratory with the Institute of Software of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and is now serving as a Co-director of the Lab.  He is also a Guest Professor of the Graduate University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Prof. Chan has provided consultancy services to government agencies and large and small to medium sized companies in Hong Kong, China, Singapore, Malaysia, and Italy. His research interests are in Data Mining, Software Engineering and Pervasive Computing.
For more information, refer to his home page.

Title: An Intelligent Home System as a Development and Test Platform for Ubiquitous Computing
Abstract: Ubiquitous Computing is concerned with the thorough integration of information processing into everyday objects and activities. As such, someone engaging in ubiquitous computing should be able to enjoy the many benefits it is supposed to bring about at home.  Since 2000, a team at the Department of Computing of The Hong Kong Polytechnic University has been developing an Ubiquitous Intelligent Home (UIH) that can demonstrate how a user can interact with “computers” at home in such a way that the user does not have to be aware that he or she is doing so. The UIH consists of four interconnecting networks: an appliance network, a furniture network, a telehealth network, and a security network. Each of these networks is made up of both hardware and software that are designed and developed to try to achieve the kind of ideal ubiquitous computing environment – one that is made up of small, inexpensive, robust networked processing devices, distributed at all scales throughout everyday life.  The UIH project has so far been “pervasive” not only in terms of its potential applications but also in terms of the researchers involved. Throughout its development, we have involved researchers in almost all areas of computing including those working on wireless sensor networking, sensor data management, data stream processing, RFID, embedded systems design, distributed processing, artificial intelligence, agent theory, speech recognition, image and video analysis, signal processing, data mining, computational intelligence, Chinese computing, data mining and machine learning, text mining, information retrieval, gesture recognition, biometrics, text-to-speech processing, software engineering, etc. In this talk, we will give the details of the UIH.

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